About the CuratorsCuratorsors

Nkule Mabaso and Nomusa Makhubu, Photo by Masimba Sasa.

Nkule Mabaso (b. 1988) graduated with a Fine Arts degree from the University of Cape Town (2011) and received a Masters in Curating at the Postgraduate Programme in Curating ZHdK, Zürich (2014). She has worked as contributing editor of the journal OnCurating.org and founded the Newcastle Creative Network in Kwazulu Natal (2011). Mabaso is the curator at the Michaelis Galleries, at the university of Cape Town. In 2017 she has also collaborated with the art historian, Manon Braat to towards the realization of the Exhibition and publication Tell Freedom: 15 South Africa Artist in 2017 at Kunsthal KaDE in Amersfoort, The Netherlands.  She has authored articles and reviews in, Artthrob, Africanah, Field-Journal. In 2017, she convened the Third Space symposium in collaboration with the Institute for Creative Arts, Decolonizing Art Institutions, and is co-editing the conference proceedings with Jyoti Mistry. Mabaso works collaboratively and her research interests engage the South Africa and Afro-continental context.

Nomusa Makhubu (b. 1984) graduated with a PhD from Rhodes University. Makhubu is a senior lecturer of art history at the University of Cape Town and an artist. She is the recipient of the ABSA L’Atelier Gerard Sekoto Award (2006), the Prix du Studio National des Arts Contemporain, Le Fresnoy (2014) and the First Runner Up in the Department of Science and Technology (DST) Women in Science Awards (2017). Makhubu was a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies and an African Studies Association (ASA) Presidential Fellow in 2016. In 2017, she was a Mandela-Mellon fellow at the Hutchins Centre for African and African American Studies, Harvard University. Makhubu is a member of the South African Young Academy of Science (SAYAS) and the deputy chairperson of Africa South Art Initiative (ASAI). In 2015, she co-edited a Third Text Special Issue: ‘The Art of Change’ (2013) and co-curated with Nkule Mabaso the international exhibition, Fantastic. Her research interests include African popular culture and socially-engaged art.